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Virginia CropMAP

Cereals, Pseudocereals, and Oilseeds

List of cereals, pseudocereals, and oilseeds crops that are either currently grown traditionally, recommended alternate, experimental, or not-recommended in Virginia.

Listing compiled and written by:
Dr. Harbans Bhardwaj, Agriclutural Research Station, Box 9061, Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA 23806. Phone: 804-524-6723; Fax: 804-524-5950; Email: hbhardwj@vsu.edu
Carl Griffey, Crop and Soil Environmental Science, 334A Smyth Hall. Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061. Phone: 540-231-9789; Fax: 540-231-3075; Email: cgriffey@vt.edu
Andy Hankins, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Box 9081, Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA 23806. Phone: 804-524-5962; Fax: 804-524-5714; Email: ahankins@vsu.edu

Traditional
Recommended
Experimental
Not Recommended

Traditional
Barley, winter hulled Well suited as a forage and/or feed grain crop throughout the state, early ripening and ideal for double-cropping systems, does not tolerate wet or low pH soils
Corn, field Well adapted, Widely grown, low profits
Cotton for Seed Established summer crop in the southern part of the state. Seeds, as a by-product, are a good source of oil but are mostly used as livestock feed.
Millet, pearl Well adapted, limited market, low profits
Milo (sorghum) Well adapted, widely grown, low profits
Oats, winter Suited as a forage and/or feed grain crop throughout the state, better suited for continuous small grain system than wheat or barley due to immunity to take-all, but generally more susceptible to barley yellow dwarf.
Peanut Established summer crop in the southern part of the state.
Rye Suited as a forage and/or cover crop, adapted to all areas of the state, very winter hardy and highly disease resistant
Soybean Established summer crop in all areas of the state.
Wheat, soft red winter Suited as a forage but generally used as a feed or food grain, adapted to all areas of the state, better winter hardiness than oats and barley
Recommended
Barley, winter hull-less Well suited as a forage and/or feed grain crop throughout the state, early ripening and ideal for double-cropping systems, probable use in food and fuel production, does not tolerate wet or low pH soils
Buckwheat Limited use as a summer crop
Canola Has potential as a profitable winter crop. Market does not exist.
Corn (Specialty) Well adapted, limited market
Rapeseed See canola.
Sorghum, sweet Well adapted, limited market for syrup
Tobacco Certified Organic May have potential
Triticale Suited for use as a forage or feed grain, adapted to all areas of the state, winter hardiness similar to winter wheat, highly disease resistant
Experimental
Amaranth Can be grown state-wide. No market.
Cuphea Has potential to supply oils for manufacture of soaps and detergents
Euphorbia Source of epoxy fatty acid-rich oil.
Flax for Oil Can be grown statewide but market does not exist
Flax for fiber Can be grown statewide but market does not exist
Flax for edible seeds Can be grown statewide but market does not exist
Lesquerella Replacement for castor. Hard to grow.
Meadowfoam Promising winter oilseed. Being commercially grown in Dinwiddie county.
Sunflower Can be grown statewide but market does not exit.
Vernonia Is a source of unique oils for use in paints, etc.
Wheat, hard red winter Possible production with introduction and/or development of adapted varieties, wetter or more humid environment likely to impact end-use quality
Wheat, winter durum Few winter varieties available and not adapted to wet, humid environment, highly susceptible to Fusarium Head Blight, minimum or no-till planting following grain corn not recommended
Not Recommended
Barley, spring Possible use for forage in areas of higher elevation, but less adapted and lower productivity than winter barley
Beet, sugar No processing facilities, no market demand
Broomcorn Adapted statewide, limited market
Castor Can be grown as an annual in most areas. Plants and seeds are poisonous
Corn, pop Well adapted, limited market
Crambe Can be grown statewide as a source of high erucic acid oil. No market.
Oats, spring Use as a forage and/or feed grain crop in areas of higher elevation, but less adapted and lower productivity than winter oats
Quinoa Can be grown statewide as a heath food. No market.
Spelt Not well adapted
Tobacco Well adapted, declining market