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Missouri CropMAP

Cereals, Pseudocereals

Prepared by Dr. Rob Myers, Jefferson Institute. This is a list of cereals and pseudocereals that are either currently grown, are recommended alternate crops, are experimental crops, or are not recommended for Missouri.

Existing Crops
Recommended New, Alternate or Underutilized Crops
Experimental New Or Alternate Crops
Not Recommended

Existing Crops Crop Information Links
Corn, field Adapted to all areas of the state; on some droughtier soils may require irrigation. Missouri
publications
extension
NewCROP
Sorghum Adapted to all areas of the state, good where corn has marginal yields, sometimes grown as double crop in southeastern part of the state. Missouri
publications
extension
NewCROP
Winter wheat Adapted to all areas of the state, better chance of profit if used with a double crop. Missouri
publications
extension
NewCROP
Spring oats Adapted to all areas, but acreage has declined substantially. Profit potential could be improved by double cropping oats with buckwheat. Missouri NewCROP
Recommended New, Alternate or Underutilized Crops
Pearl millet New semi-dwarf hybrid grain types are well suited to droughty soils, especially sandy conditions. Yield and income potential are low with current varieties, but crop has good feed value for chickens and other livestock. Missouri NewCROP
Spelt A type of wheat that retains its hull, similar to oats. Export market as food crop to Europe, mostly for organic spelt. Missouri NewCROP
Buckwheat A pseudocereal (broadleaf) well suited for double cropping after wheat or other crops that can be harvested by mid to late July. Primarily exported to Japan as a food crop. Shortest season alternative grain crop. Missouri NewCROP
Amaranth This broadleaf plant is widely adapted and relatively drought tolerant. Used for a variety of health food cereal and bread products, amaranth commands a high price, but has a very limited market demand, so production acreage should be kept small. Missouri NewCROP
Experimental New Or Alternate Crops
Foxtail (German) millet Long used as a food crop in China, foxtail millet has been used almost exclusively as a forage in the U.S. This crop is an easy to grow, short season crop with relatively good seed yield for an alternative grain. Uses and markets for the grain need to be developed. Missouri NewCROP
Finger millet (ragi) This crop is used in East Africa for food, and is agronomically adapted to seed production in Missouri. Seed yields appear low, so profit potential is questionable. Missouri NewCROP
Japanese millet Marketed in Missouri for wildlife plantings, this crop could have relatively high seed value, but seed yield will be low. Missouri NewCROP
Browntop millet Marketed in Missouri for wildlife plantings, this crop could have relatively high seed value, but seed yield will be low. Missouri NewCROP
Teff This Ethiopian food crop is reportedly adapted to tough growing conditions. A short grass with tiny seeds, teff may have a variety of uses, not only food, but also as a forage and possibly for temporary ground cover. Missouri NewCROP
Not recommended
Proso millet Missouri climate seems too humid for this birdseed and food crop which is grown in the western Great Plains. Gets diseases and does not produce well. Missouri NewCROP
Job's tears (adlay millet) This grass crop produces an interesting pea-sized round pod that can be strung on a string for beads. Seed yield potential appears very low, and no know market exists for the crop. Missouri NewCROP
Fonio Landraces of this African grass that were tested in Missouri did not flower and produce seed under our daylength conditions. Missouri NewCROP
Quinoa A pseudocereal that has uses in the health food market similar to amaranth. Unlike amaranth, current quinoa cultivars are not well adapted to Missouri, having been selected for cooler intermountain areas of Colorado and the west. Missouri NewCROP

The cereals and pseudocereals listing was compiled and written by Dr. Rob Myers, Jefferson Institute. Questions related to these crops should be addressed to Dr. Rob Myers 601 W. Nifong Blvd., Ste. 5A Columbia, MO 65203
Ph: 573-449-3518
Email: rmyers@tranquility.net